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Alice in Wonderland (1915)

Alice in Wonderland (1915) quotes

59 total quotes

Intertitles




View Quote C.f. "A Caucus-Race and a Long Tale," ch. 3 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 32: "What I was going to say," said the Dodo in an offended tone, "was, that the best thing to get us dry would be a Caucus-race."
View Quote C.f. "A Caucus-Race and a Long Tale," ch. 3 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), pp. 39–40: "Dinah's our cat.  And she's such a capital one for catching mice, you can't think!  And oh, I wish you could see her after the birds!  Why, she'll eat a little bird as soon as look at it!"

"I wish I hadn't mentioned Dinah!" she said to herself in a melancholy tone.  "Nobody seems to like her, down here, and I'm sure she's the best cat in the world!  Oh, my dear Dinah!  I wonder if I shall ever see you any more!"
To herself
View Quote C.f. "Down the Rabbit-Hole," ch. 1 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 6.
View Quote C.f. "Down the Rabbit-Hole," ch. 1 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 7: There were doors all round the hall, but they were all locked; and when Alice had been all the way down one side and up the other, trying every door, she walked sadly down the middle, wondering how she was ever to get out again.
View Quote C.f. "Down the Rabbit-Hole," ch. 1 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 8: Alice opened the door and found that it led into a small passage, not much larger than a rat-hole: she knelt down and looked along the passage into the loveliest garden you ever saw.
View Quote C.f. "Pig and Pepper," ch. 6 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 81: "There's certainly too much pepper in that soup!" Alice said to herself, as well as she could for sneezing.
View Quote C.f. "Pig and Pepper," ch. 6 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 82: "Please would you tell me," said Alice, a little timidly, for she was not quite sure whether it was good manners for her to speak first, "why your cat grins like that?""It's a Cheshire cat," said the Duchess, "and that's why.  Pig!"
The Duchess's Lullaby
View Quote C.f. "Pig and Pepper," ch. 6 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 85.
View Quote C.f. "Pig and Pepper," ch. 6 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 94: "Well!  I've often seen a cat without a grin," thought Alice; "but a grin without a cat!  It's the most curious thing I ever saw in all my life!"
View Quote C.f. "The Lobster Quadrille," ch. 10 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 160. To Alice
View Quote C.f. "The Mock Turtle's Story," ch. 9 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 139: "Why, she," said the Gryphon.  "It's all her fancy, that: they never executes nobody, you know.  Come on!"
"Everybody says 'come on!' here," thought Alice, as she went slowly after it: "I never was so ordered about before, in all my life, never!"
View Quote C.f. "The Mock Turtle's Story," ch. 9 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 140: "Once," said the Mock Turtle at last, with a deep sigh, "I was a real Turtle."
These words were followed by a very long silence, broken only by an occasional exclamation of "Hjckrrh!" from the Gryphon, and the constant heavy sobbing of the Mock Turtle.
View Quote C.f. "The Mock Turtle's Story," ch. 9 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 143: "Reeling and Writhing, of course, to begin with," the Mock Turtle replied: "and then the different branches of Arithmetic—Ambition, Distraction, Uglification, and Derision."
View Quote C.f. "The Mock Turtle's Story," ch. 9 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), pp. 141–142: "When we were little," the Mock Turtle went on at last, more calmly, though still sobbing a little now and then, "we went to school in the sea.  The master was an old Turtle—we used to call him Tortoise—"
"Why did you call him Tortoise, if he wasn't one?" Alice asked.
"We called him Tortoise, because he taught us," said the Mock Turtle angrily; "really you are very dull!"
View Quote C.f. "The Pool of Tears," ch. 2 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 18: It was the White Rabbit returning, splendidly dressed, with a pair of white kid gloves in one hand and a large fan in the other: he came trotting along in a great hurry, muttering to himself as he came, "Oh! the Duchess, the Duchess!  Oh! won't she be savage if I've kept her waiting!"
Reading the accusation