Psycho

Psycho quotes

44 total quotes (ID: 882)

Detective Milton Arbogast
Marion Crane
Norman Bates
Others


Norman Bates: You-you eat like a bird.
Marion Crane: [Looking around at the stuffed birds] And you'd know, of course.
Norman Bates: No, not really. Anyway, I hear the expression 'eats like a bird' -- it-it's really a fals-fals-fals-falsity. Because birds really eat a tremendous lot. But I-I don't really know anything about birds. My hobby is stuffing things. You know -- taxidermy. And I guess I'd rather stuff birds because I hate the look of beasts when their stuffed -- you know, foxes and chimps. Some people even stuff dogs and cats -- but, oh, I can't do that. I think only birds look well stuffed because -- well, because they're kind of passive to begin with.


Norman Bates: If you love someone, you don't do that even if you hate them. You understand that I don't hate her -- I hate what she's become. I hate the illness.
Marion Crane: Wouldn't it be better if you put her... someplace.
Norman Bates: You mean an institution? A madhouse?
Marion Crane: No, I didn't mean it like --
Norman Bates: [suddenly angry] People always call a madhouse "someplace", don't they? "Put her in someplace."
Marion Crane: I-I'm sorry. I didn't mean it to sound so uncaring.
Norman Bates: What do you know about caring? Have you ever seen the inside of one of those places? The laughing, and the tears, and the cruel eyes studying you? My mother there? Oh, but she's harmless! She's as harmless as one of those stuffed birds!
Marion Crane: I am sorry. I only felt... it seems she's hurting you. I tried to mean well.
Norman Bates: People always mean well! They cluck their thick tongues, and shake their heads and suggest, oh, so very delicately! Of course, I've suggested it myself. But I hate to even think about it. She needs me. It-it's not as if she were a maniac -- a raving thing. She just goes a little mad sometimes. We all go a little mad sometimes. Haven't you.
Marion Crane: Yes. Sometimes just one time can be enough. Thank you.
Norman Bates: Thank you, Norman.
Marion Crane: Norman.

Deputy Sheriff Al Chambers: Your detective told you he couldn't come right back because he was goin' to question Norman Bates' mother. Right?
Lila Crane: Yes.
Al Chambers: Norman Bates' mother has been dead and buried in Greenlawn Cemetery for the past ten years!
Mrs. Eliza Chambers: I helped Norman pick out the dress she was buried in. Periwinkle blue.
Al Chambers: It ain't only local history, Sam. It's the only case of murder and suicide on Fairvale ledgers. Mrs. Bates poisoned this guy she was involved with when she found out he was married. Then took a helpin' of the same stuff herself. Strychnine. Ugly way to die.
Eliza Chambers: Norman found them dead together in bed.
Sam Loomis: You mean the old woman I saw tonight wasn't Mrs. Bates?
Al Chambers: Now wait a minute, Sam, are you sure you saw an old woman?
Sam Loomis: Yes! In the house behind the motel! I called and pounded but she just ignored me!
Al Chambers: You mean to tell me you saw Norman Bates' mother?
Lila Crane: But it had to be, because Arbogast said so too. And the young man wouldn't let him see her because she was too ill.
Al Chambers: Well if the woman up there is Mrs. Bates, who's that woman buried out in Greenlawn Cemetery?

Tom Cassidy: Yeah, tomorrow's the day! My sweet little girl -- [He leers over at Marion] -- Oh, oh, not you -- my daughter, a baby. And tomorrow she stands her sweet self up there and gets married away from me. I want you to take a look at my baby. Eighteen years old, and she never had an unhappy day in any of those years!
George Lowery: Come on, Tom. My office is air conditioned.
Tom Cassidy: You know what I do about unhappiness? I buy it off. Are, uh, are you unhappy?
Marion Crane: Not inordinately.
Tom Cassidy: I'm buying this house for my baby's wedding present. Forty thousand dollars, cash! Now that's not buying happiness. That's just buying off unhappiness. [waves money in front of Marion] I never carry more than I can afford to lose! Count 'em.
Caroline: I declare!
Tom Cassidy: [staring at Marion] I don't! That's how I get to keep it!
George Lowery: Tom, uh... cash transactions of this size! Most irregular.

Hardware Store Customer: [Looking at can] They tell you what its ingredients are, and how it's guaranteed to exterminate every insect in the world, but they do not tell you whether or not it's painless. And-and I say, insect or man, death should always be painless.
Caroline: He was flirting with you. I guess he must have noticed my wedding ring.
Norman Bates' Mother: [in police custody, as Norman is thinking] It is sad when a mother has to speak the words that condemn her own son. I can't allow them to think I would commit murder. Put him away now as I should have years ago. He was always bad and in the end he intended to tell them I killed those girls and that man, as if I could do anything but just sit and stare like one of his stuffed birds. They know I can't move a finger and I want to just sit here and be quiet just in case they suspect me. They're probably watching me. Well, let them. Let them see what kind of a person I am. I'm not even going to swat that fly. I hope they are watching... they'll see. They'll see and they'll know, and they'll say, "Why, she wouldn't even harm a fly..."

Norman Bates: Now, mother, I'm going to uh, bring something up...
Norman Bates' Mother: Haha... I am sorry, boy, but you do manage to look ludicrous when you give me orders.
Norman Bates: Please, mother.
Norman Bates' Mother: No! I will not hide in the fruit cellar! Ha! You think I'm fruity, huh? I'm staying right here. This is my room and no one will drag me out of it, least of all my big, bold son!
Norman Bates: They'll come now, mother! He came after the girl and now someone will come after him. Please, mother, it's just for a few days, just for a few days so they won't find you!
Norman Bates' Mother: 'Just for a few days'? In that dark, dank fruit cellar? No! You hid me there once boy, and you'll not do it again, not ever again, now get out! I told you to get out, boy.
Norman Bates: I'll carry you, mother.
Norman Bates' Mother: Norman! What do you think you're doing? Don't you touch me, don't! Norman! Put me down, put me down, I can walk on my own...

Dr. Fred Richmond: Like I said... the mother... Now to understand it the way I understood it, hearing it from the mother... that is, from the mother half of Norman's mind... you have to go back ten years, to the time when Norman murdered his mother and her lover. Now he was already dangerously disturbed, had been ever since his father died. His mother was a clinging, demanding woman, and for years the two of them lived as if there was no one else in the world. Then she met a man... and it seemed to Norman that she 'threw him over' for this man. Now that pushed him, over the line and he killed them both. Matricide is probably the most unbearable crime of all... most unbearable to the son who commits it. So he had to erase the crime, at least in his own mind. He stole her corpse. A weighted coffin was buried. He hid in the body in the fruit cellar. Even treated it to keep it as well as it would keep. And that still wasn't enough. She was there! But she was a corpse. So he began to speak for her, give her half his life, so to speak. At times, he could be both personalities, carry on conversations. At other times, the mother half took over completely. Now he was never all Norman, but he was often only mother. And because he was so pathologically jealous of her, he assumed that she was jealous of him. Therefore, if he felt a strong attraction to any other woman, the mother side of him would go wild. [to Lila] When he met your sister, he was touched by her... aroused by her. He wanted her. That set off the 'jealous mother' and 'mother killed the girl' Now after the murder, Norman returned as if from a deep sleep. And like a dutiful son, covered up all traces of the crime he was convinced his mother had committed!
Sam Loomis: Why was he dressed like that?
District Attorney: He's a tranvestite!
Dr. Fred Richmond: Ah, not exactly. A man who dresses in women's clothing in order to achieve a sexual change, or satisfaction, is a transvestite. But in Norman's case, he was simply doing everything possible to keep alive the illusion of his mother being alive. And when reality came too close, when danger or desire threatened that illusion -- he dressed up, even to a cheap wig he bought. He'd walk about the house, sit in her chair, speak in her voice. He tried to be mother! And uh now he is. Now that's what I meant when I said I got the story from the mother. You see, when the mind houses two personalities, there's always a conflict, a battle. In Norman's case, the battle is over -- and the dominant personality has won.
Al Chambers: And the forty thousand dollars? Who got that?
Dr. Richmond: The swamp. These were crimes of passion, not profit.
Police Officer [entering room with blanket on arm] He feels a little chill. Can I bring him this blanket?
Dr. Richmond: [lighting cigarette] Oh, sure.
Police Chief James Mitchell: All right.

Marion Crane: I've caused you some trouble.
Norman Bates: No. Mother, my mother, uh, what's the phrase? She isn't quite herself today.
Marion Crane: You should have bothered. I really don't have that much of an appetite.
Norman Bates: Oh, I'm sorry. I wish you could apologize for other people.

Lila Crane: She left home on Friday. I was in Tuscon over the weekend and I haven't heard from her since -- not even a phone call. Look if you two are in this thing together, I don't care -- It's none of my business -- but I want to talk to Marion and I want her to tell me it's none of my business! And then I'll go--
Sam Loomis: Bob! Run out and get yourself some lunch, will you?
Bob Summerfield: Oh, that's okay, Sam, I brought it with me.
Sam Loomis: Run out and eat it!

Norman Bates: You know what I think? I think that we're all in our private traps, clamped in them, and none of us can ever get out. We scratch and we claw, but only at the air, only at each other, and for all of it, we never budge an inch.
Marion Crane: Sometimes, we deliberately step into those traps.
Norman Bates: I was born into mine. I don't mind it anymore.
Marion Crane: Oh, but you should. You should mind it.
Norman Bates: Oh, I do, [laughs] but I say I don't.
Marion Crane: You know -- if anyone ever talked to me the way I heard -- the way she spoke to you...
Norman Bates: Sometimes -- when she talks to me like that -- I feel I'd like to go up there, and curse her, and-and-and leave her forever! Or at least defy her! But I know I can't. She's ill.

Norman Bates' Mother: No! I tell you no! I won't have you bringing some young girl in for supper! By candlelight, I suppose, in the cheap, erotic fashion of young men with cheap, erotic minds!
Norman Bates: Mother, please...!
Norman Bates' Mother: And then what? After supper? Music? Whispers?
Norman Bates: Mother, she's just a stranger. She's hungry, and it's raining out!
Norman Bates' Mother: [mockingly] "Mother, she's just a stranger"! As if men don't desire strangers! As if... ohh, I refuse to speak of disgusting things, because they disgust me! You understand, boy? Go on, go tell her she'll not be appeasing her ugly appetite with MY food... or my son! Or do I have to tell her because you don't have the guts! Huh, boy? You have the guts, boy?
Norman Bates: [shouts] Shut up! Shut up!

California Charlie: [voiceover while Marion is driving] Heck, Officer, that was the first time I ever saw the customer high-pressure the salesman! Somebody chasin' her?
Highway Patrol Officer: I better have a look at those papers, Charlie.
Charlie: She look like a "wrong one" to you?
Officer: Acted like one.
Charlie: The only funny thing, she paid me seven hundred dollars in cash.
Caroline: Yes, Mr. Lowery?
George Lowery: Caroline? Marion still isn't in?
Caroline: No, Mr. Lowery. But then, she's always a bit late on Monday mornings.
George Lowery: Buzz me the minute she comes in. Then call her sister -- if no one's answering at the house.
Caroline: I called her sister, Mr. Lowery, where she works -- the Music Makers Music Store, you know -- and she doesn't know where Marion is any more than we do.
George Lowery: You'd better run out to the house. She may be, well -- unable to answer the phone.
Caroline: Her sister's going to do that. She's as worried as we are.
George Lowery: No, I haven't the faintest idea. As I said, I last saw your sister when she left the office on Friday. She said she didn't feel well and wanted to leave early; I said she could. That was the last I saw -- Now wait a minute. I did see her sometime later, driving -- Ah, I think you'd better come over here to my office -- quick! Caroline, get Mr. Cassidy for me! After all, Cassidy, I told you -- all that cash! I'm not taking the responsibility! Oh, for heaven's sake! A girl works for you for ten years, you trust her! All right. Yes. You better come over.
Tom Cassidy: Well, I ain't about to kiss off forty thousand dollars! I'll get it back, and if any of it's missin' I'll replace it with her fine, soft flesh! I'll track her, never you doubt it!
George Lowery: Oh, hold on, Cassidy! I-I still can't believe -- it must be some kind of mystery. I-I can't...
Tom Cassidy: You checked with the bank, no? They never laid eyes on her, no? You still trustin'? Hot creepers! She sat there while I dumped it out! Hardly even looked at it! Plannin'! And -- even flirtin' with me!

Lila Crane: Look, that old woman, whoever she is, she told Arbogast something. I want her to tell us the same thing.
Sam Loomis: Hold it, you can't go up there.
Lila Crane: Why not?
Sam Loomis: Bates.
Lila Crane: Then, let's find him. One of us can keep him occupied while the other gets to the old woman.
Sam Loomis: You'll never be able to hold him still even if he doesn't want to be held. And, I don't like you going into that house alone.
Lila Crane: I can handle a sick old woman!

Caroline: [taking pill bottle out of purse] I've got something -- not aspirin. My mother's doctor gave them to me the day of my wedding. Teddy was furious when he found out I had taken tranquilizers!
Marion Crane: [applying lipstick] There any calls?
Caroline: Teddy called me -- my mother called to see if Teddy called. Oh, your sister called to say she's going to Tucson to do some buying and she'll be gone the whole weekend, and --
[coversation interrupted]

A boy's best friend is his mother. Note: ranked #56 in the American Film Institute's list of the top 100 movie quotations in American cinema.