Psycho

Psycho quotes

44 total quotes (ID: 882)

Detective Milton Arbogast
Marion Crane
Norman Bates
Others


Norman Bates: If you love someone, you don't do that even if you hate them. You understand that I don't hate her -- I hate what she's become. I hate the illness.
Marion Crane: Wouldn't it be better if you put her... someplace.
Norman Bates: You mean an institution? A madhouse?
Marion Crane: No, I didn't mean it like --
Norman Bates: [suddenly angry] People always call a madhouse "someplace", don't they? "Put her in someplace."
Marion Crane: I-I'm sorry. I didn't mean it to sound so uncaring.
Norman Bates: What do you know about caring? Have you ever seen the inside of one of those places? The laughing, and the tears, and the cruel eyes studying you? My mother there? Oh, but she's harmless! She's as harmless as one of those stuffed birds!
Marion Crane: I am sorry. I only felt... it seems she's hurting you. I tried to mean well.
Norman Bates: People always mean well! They cluck their thick tongues, and shake their heads and suggest, oh, so very delicately! Of course, I've suggested it myself. But I hate to even think about it. She needs me. It-it's not as if she were a maniac -- a raving thing. She just goes a little mad sometimes. We all go a little mad sometimes. Haven't you.
Marion Crane: Yes. Sometimes just one time can be enough. Thank you.
Norman Bates: Thank you, Norman.
Marion Crane: Norman.


Norman Bates: Now, mother, I'm going to uh, bring something up...
Norman Bates' Mother: Haha... I am sorry, boy, but you do manage to look ludicrous when you give me orders.
Norman Bates: Please, mother.
Norman Bates' Mother: No! I will not hide in the fruit cellar! Ha! You think I'm fruity, huh? I'm staying right here. This is my room and no one will drag me out of it, least of all my big, bold son!
Norman Bates: They'll come now, mother! He came after the girl and now someone will come after him. Please, mother, it's just for a few days, just for a few days so they won't find you!
Norman Bates' Mother: 'Just for a few days'? In that dark, dank fruit cellar? No! You hid me there once boy, and you'll not do it again, not ever again, now get out! I told you to get out, boy.
Norman Bates: I'll carry you, mother.
Norman Bates' Mother: Norman! What do you think you're doing? Don't you touch me, don't! Norman! Put me down, put me down, I can walk on my own...

Norman Bates: You know what I think? I think that we're all in our private traps, clamped in them, and none of us can ever get out. We scratch and we claw, but only at the air, only at each other, and for all of it, we never budge an inch.
Marion Crane: Sometimes, we deliberately step into those traps.
Norman Bates: I was born into mine. I don't mind it anymore.
Marion Crane: Oh, but you should. You should mind it.
Norman Bates: Oh, I do, [laughs] but I say I don't.
Marion Crane: You know -- if anyone ever talked to me the way I heard -- the way she spoke to you...
Norman Bates: Sometimes -- when she talks to me like that -- I feel I'd like to go up there, and curse her, and-and-and leave her forever! Or at least defy her! But I know I can't. She's ill.

Norman Bates: You-you eat like a bird.
Marion Crane: [Looking around at the stuffed birds] And you'd know, of course.
Norman Bates: No, not really. Anyway, I hear the expression 'eats like a bird' -- it-it's really a fals-fals-fals-falsity. Because birds really eat a tremendous lot. But I-I don't really know anything about birds. My hobby is stuffing things. You know -- taxidermy. And I guess I'd rather stuff birds because I hate the look of beasts when their stuffed -- you know, foxes and chimps. Some people even stuff dogs and cats -- but, oh, I can't do that. I think only birds look well stuffed because -- well, because they're kind of passive to begin with.

Sam Loomis: I'm not saying that you shouldn't be contended here, I'm just doubting that you are. I think if you saw the chance to get out from under you would unload this place.
Norman Bates: This place? This place happens to be my only world. I grew up in that house up there. I happen to have a very happy childhood. My mother and I were more than happy.

Sam Loomis: I've been doing all the talking so far, haven't I? I thought it was the people who were all alone all the time who did most of the talking when they got the chance. Here you are doing all the listening. You're alone here aren't you? Drive me crazy.
Norman Bates: I think that would be a rather extreme reaction, don't you?
Sam Loomis: Just an expression. What I meant was, I'd do just about anything to get away, wouldn't you?
Norman Bates: No.

Sam Loomis: You never did eat your lunch, did you?
Marion Crane: I better get back to the office. These extended lunch hours give my boss excess acid.
Sam Loomis: Why don't you call your boss and tell him you're taking the rest of the afternoon off? It's Friday, anyway -- and hot.
Marion Crane: What do I do with my free afternoon? Walk you to the airport?
Sam Loomis: Well, you could laze around here a while longer.
Marion Crane: Hmm. Checking out time is 3 PM. Hotels of this sort are interested in you when you come in, but when your time is up. Oh Sam, I hate having to be with you in a place like this.
Sam Loomis: Married couples deliberately spend an occasional night in a cheap hotel.
Marion Crane: I know marriage can do a lot of things deliberately.
Sam Loomis: You sure talk like a girl who's been married.
Marion Crane: Sam, this is the last time.
Sam Loomis: For what?
Marion Crane: For this, meeting you in secret so we can be secretive. You come down here on business trips. We steal lunch hours. I wish you wouldn't even come.
Sam Loomis: All right, what do we do instead? Write each other lurid love letters?

Tom Cassidy: Yeah, tomorrow's the day! My sweet little girl -- [He leers over at Marion] -- Oh, oh, not you -- my daughter, a baby. And tomorrow she stands her sweet self up there and gets married away from me. I want you to take a look at my baby. Eighteen years old, and she never had an unhappy day in any of those years!
George Lowery: Come on, Tom. My office is air conditioned.
Tom Cassidy: You know what I do about unhappiness? I buy it off. Are, uh, are you unhappy?
Marion Crane: Not inordinately.
Tom Cassidy: I'm buying this house for my baby's wedding present. Forty thousand dollars, cash! Now that's not buying happiness. That's just buying off unhappiness. [waves money in front of Marion] I never carry more than I can afford to lose! Count 'em.
Caroline: I declare!
Tom Cassidy: [staring at Marion] I don't! That's how I get to keep it!
George Lowery: Tom, uh... cash transactions of this size! Most irregular.

[affably] Dirty night.

A hobby should pass the time, not fill it.

Are you sure you wouldn't like to stay just a little while longer? Just for talk?

Gee, I'm sorry I didn't hear you in all this rain. Go ahead in, please.

Hate the smell of dampness, don't you? It's such a, I don't know, creepy smell.

Headaches are like resolutions. You forget them as soon as they stop hurting.

I don't even much bother with, uh, guests registering anymore. You know, one by one, you drop the formalities. I shouldn't even bother changing the sheets but old habits die hard.