Pride and Prejudice (2005)

Pride and Prejudice (2005) quotes

26 total quotes (ID: 960)

Elizabeth Bennet
Mr. Darcy
Other


I have been so blind.


Barely tolerable, I dare say, but not handsome enough to tempt me.

Mr. Bingley: Well, I think it's amazing that you young ladies have the patience to become so accomplished.
Miss Bingley: Whatever can you mean, Charles?
Mr. Bingley: You all paint tables, and play the piano, and embroider cushions! I never heard of lady but people say she is accomplished.
Mr. Darcy: Indeed, the word is applied too liberally. I cannot boast of knowing more than half a dozen young women in all my aquaintence who are truly accomplished.
Elizabeth Bennet: My goodness, you must comprehend a great deal of the word.
Miss Bingley: Indeed; she must have a thorough knowledge of music, singing, drawing, dancing, and all the modern languages to deserve the word. And something about her air, and manner of walking....
Mr. Darcy: [glanced at the book in Lizzie's hands] And, of course, she must improve her mind with extensive reading.
Elizabeth Bennet: [closes the book she had been reading] I am no longer surprised at your knowing only six accomplished women, I now wonder at your knowing any.
Mr. Darcy: Are you so severe on your own sex?"
Elizabeth Bennet: I never saw such a woman. Surely she would be a fearsome thing to behold.
[Mr. Bingley guffaws] Caroline Bingley: Miss Elizabeth, let us take a turn about the room.
[Caroline takes Lizzy's arm in hers, and they walk gracefully in a circle around the room] Caroline Bingley: It's refreshing, is it not after sitting so long in one attitude?
Elizabeth Bennet: And it is a small kind of accomplishment, I suppose.
Caroline Bingley: Will you not join us, Mr. Darcy?
Mr. Darcy: You can only have two motives, Caroline and I would interfere with either.
Caroline Bingley: What can he mean?
Elizabeth Bennet: Our surest way of disappointing him will be to ask him nothing about it.
Caroline Bingley: But Do tell us, Mr. Darcy.
Mr. Darcy: Either you are in each other's confidence and have secret affairs to discuss, or you are conscious that your figures appear to the greatest advantage by walking. If the first, I should get in your way. If the second, I can admire you much better from here.

Caroline Bingley: Shocking! How should we punish him for such a speech?
Elizabeth Bennet: We could always laugh at him.
Caroline Bingley: Oh no, Mr. Darcy is not to be teased.
Elizabeth Bennet: Are you too proud, Mr. Darcy? And tell me, would you consider pride to be a fault or a virtue?
Mr. Darcy: That I couldn't say.
Elizabeth Bennet: Because we're desperately trying to find a fault in you.

Only the deepest love will persuade me into matrimony which is why I shall end up an old maid.

You are too generous to trifle with me. I believe you spoke with my aunt last night, and it has taught me to hope as I'd scarcely allowed myself before. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes have not changed, but one word from you will silence me forever. If, however, your feelings have changed, I will have to tell you: you have bewitched me, body and soul, and I love... I love... I love you. And I never wish to be parted from you from this day on.

Charlotte: We are all fools in love.
Mary Bennet: What are men compared to rocks and mountains?
Mr. Wickham: He liked me better, and Darcy couldn't stand it.

Elizabeth Bennet: Either every young man in this room is going to be in love with you by the end of this evening, or I am no judge of beauty.
Jane Bennet: Or men.
Elizabeth Bennet: No, they are far too easy to judge.
Jane Bennet: They're not all bad.
Elizabeth Bennet: Humorless poppy****s, in my limited experience.
Jane Bennet: One of these days, Lizzie, someone will catch your eye, and then you'll have to watch your tongue.

Elizabeth Bennet: Which of our painted pea****s is our Mr. Bingley?
Charlotte Lucas: He's the one on the left. And on the right is his sister.
Elizabeth Bennet: And the person with the quizzical brow?
Charlotte Lucas: That is his good friend, Mr. Darcy.
Elizabeth Bennet: He looks miserable, poor soul.
Charlotte Lucas: Miserable he may be, but poor he most certainly is not.
Elizabeth Bennet: Tell me.
Charlotte Lucas: 10,000 a year and he owns half of Derbyshire.
Elizabeth Bennet: The miserable half?

Elizabeth Bennet: Do you dance, Mr. Darcy?
Mr. Darcy: Not if I can help it.

Mr. Bingley: I have never seen so many pretty girls in my life!
Mr. Darcy: On the contrary, you were dancing with the only handsome one in the entire room.
Mr. Bingley: She is the most beautiful creature I have ever met! But her sister Elizabeth is very amiable...
Mr. Darcy: Barely tolerable, I should think; but not nearly handsome enough to tempt me.

Mr. Darcy: Then what do you suggest, to encourage affection?
Elizabeth Bennet: Dancing, even if one's partner is barely tolerable. [turns around and leaves]

Miss Bingley: You write uncommonly fast, Mr. Darcy.
Mr. Darcy: [not looking up from his letter] You are mistaken, I write rather slowly.
Miss Bingley: Letters of business, too i presume; how odious I should think them.
Mr. Darcy: Well, then, it is fortunate that they fall to my lot rather than yours.

Mr. Collins: And what excellent boiled potatoes. It's been many years since I had such an exemplary vegetable. To which of my fair cousins should I pay the compliment?
Mrs. Bennet: Mr. Collins, we are perfectly capable of keeping a cook.

Mr. Darcy: May I have the next dance, Miss Elizabeth?
Elizabeth Bennet: You May.