Pride and Prejudice (2005)

Pride and Prejudice (2005) quotes

26 total quotes (ID: 960)

Elizabeth Bennet
Mr. Darcy
Other


Caroline Bingley: Shocking! How should we punish him for such a speech?
Elizabeth Bennet: We could always laugh at him.
Caroline Bingley: Oh no, Mr. Darcy is not to be teased.
Elizabeth Bennet: Are you too proud, Mr. Darcy? And tell me, would you consider pride to be a fault or a virtue?
Mr. Darcy: That I couldn't say.
Elizabeth Bennet: Because we're desperately trying to find a fault in you.


Charlotte: We are all fools in love.
Mary Bennet: What are men compared to rocks and mountains?
Mr. Wickham: He liked me better, and Darcy couldn't stand it.

Elizabeth Bennet: Either every young man in this room is going to be in love with you by the end of this evening, or I am no judge of beauty.
Jane Bennet: Or men.
Elizabeth Bennet: No, they are far too easy to judge.
Jane Bennet: They're not all bad.
Elizabeth Bennet: Humorless poppy****s, in my limited experience.
Jane Bennet: One of these days, Lizzie, someone will catch your eye, and then you'll have to watch your tongue.

Elizabeth Bennet: Which of our painted pea****s is our Mr. Bingley?
Charlotte Lucas: He's the one on the left. And on the right is his sister.
Elizabeth Bennet: And the person with the quizzical brow?
Charlotte Lucas: That is his good friend, Mr. Darcy.
Elizabeth Bennet: He looks miserable, poor soul.
Charlotte Lucas: Miserable he may be, but poor he most certainly is not.
Elizabeth Bennet: Tell me.
Charlotte Lucas: 10,000 a year and he owns half of Derbyshire.
Elizabeth Bennet: The miserable half?

Elizabeth Bennet: [refusing to visit Pemberley]He's so...he's so rich.
Mr. Gardiner: Oh, heavens Lizzy! What a snob you are! Objecting to poor Mr. Darcy because of his wealth! The man can't help it.

Elizabeth Bennet: And what a beautiful pianoforte!
Georgiana Darcy: My brother gave it to me. He shouldn't have--
Mr. Darcy: Yes, I should've.
Georgiana Darcy: Oh, very well, then.
[smiling at Lizzy]
Mr. Darcy: Easily persuaded, is she not?
Elizabeth Bennet: Your unfortunate brother once had to put up with my playing for a whole evening.
Georgiana Darcy: [looking astonished] But he says you play so well!
Elizabeth Bennet: Then he has perjured himself most profoundly.
[laughing]
Mr. Darcy: No, I said "played quite well."
Elizabeth Bennet: Oh, "quite well" is not "very well." I'm satisfied.

Elizabeth Bennet: Do you dance, Mr. Darcy?
Mr. Darcy: Not if I can help it.

Georgiana Darcy: Do you play duets, Miss Elizabeth?
Elizabeth Bennet: Only when forced.
Georgiana Darcy: [to Darcy] Brother, you must force her.

Lydia Bennet: [talking about finding a best man for her wedding] ...luckily he did show up, or we would have had to ask Mr. Darcy--
Elizabeth Bennet: Mr. Darcy?
Lydia Bennet: Oh! But I shouldn't say...
Elizabeth Bennet: Mr. Darcy was at your wedding?
Lydia Bennet: He was the one who discovered us. He paid for the wedding, Wickham's commission, everything. But I shouldn't have said anything, he told me not to tell.
Elizabeth Bennet: Mr. Darcy...?
Lydia Bennet: Oh, hush, Lizzie. Honestly, Mr. Darcy isn't half so high and mighty as you sometimes.

Miss Bingley: You write uncommonly fast, Mr. Darcy.
Mr. Darcy: [not looking up from his letter] You are mistaken, I write rather slowly.
Miss Bingley: Letters of business, too i presume; how odious I should think them.
Mr. Darcy: Well, then, it is fortunate that they fall to my lot rather than yours.

Mr. Bennet: Lizzie, are you out of your senses? I thought you hated the man.
Elizabeth Bennet: No, Papa.
Mr. Bennet: He's rich, to be sure, and you will have more fine carriages than Jane. But will that make you happy?
Elizabeth Bennet: Have you no objection other than your belief in my indifference?
Mr. Bennet: None at all. We all know him to be a proud, unpleasant sort of fellow... but that would be nothing if you really liked him.
Elizabeth Bennet: I do like him.
Mr. Bennet: Well...
Elizabeth Bennet: I love him.

Mr. Bingley: I have never seen so many pretty girls in my life!
Mr. Darcy: On the contrary, you were dancing with the only handsome one in the entire room.
Mr. Bingley: She is the most beautiful creature I have ever met! But her sister Elizabeth is very amiable...
Mr. Darcy: Barely tolerable, I should think; but not nearly handsome enough to tempt me.

Mr. Bingley: Well, I think it's amazing that you young ladies have the patience to become so accomplished.
Miss Bingley: Whatever can you mean, Charles?
Mr. Bingley: You all paint tables, and play the piano, and embroider cushions! I never heard of lady but people say she is accomplished.
Mr. Darcy: Indeed, the word is applied too liberally. I cannot boast of knowing more than half a dozen young women in all my aquaintence who are truly accomplished.
Elizabeth Bennet: My goodness, you must comprehend a great deal of the word.
Miss Bingley: Indeed; she must have a thorough knowledge of music, singing, drawing, dancing, and all the modern languages to deserve the word. And something about her air, and manner of walking....
Mr. Darcy: [glanced at the book in Lizzie's hands] And, of course, she must improve her mind with extensive reading.
Elizabeth Bennet: [closes the book she had been reading] I am no longer surprised at your knowing only six accomplished women, I now wonder at your knowing any.
Mr. Darcy: Are you so severe on your own sex?"
Elizabeth Bennet: I never saw such a woman. Surely she would be a fearsome thing to behold.
[Mr. Bingley guffaws] Caroline Bingley: Miss Elizabeth, let us take a turn about the room.
[Caroline takes Lizzy's arm in hers, and they walk gracefully in a circle around the room] Caroline Bingley: It's refreshing, is it not after sitting so long in one attitude?
Elizabeth Bennet: And it is a small kind of accomplishment, I suppose.
Caroline Bingley: Will you not join us, Mr. Darcy?
Mr. Darcy: You can only have two motives, Caroline and I would interfere with either.
Caroline Bingley: What can he mean?
Elizabeth Bennet: Our surest way of disappointing him will be to ask him nothing about it.
Caroline Bingley: But Do tell us, Mr. Darcy.
Mr. Darcy: Either you are in each other's confidence and have secret affairs to discuss, or you are conscious that your figures appear to the greatest advantage by walking. If the first, I should get in your way. If the second, I can admire you much better from here.

Mr. Collins: And what excellent boiled potatoes. It's been many years since I had such an exemplary vegetable. To which of my fair cousins should I pay the compliment?
Mrs. Bennet: Mr. Collins, we are perfectly capable of keeping a cook.

Mr. Collins: Mrs. Bennet I was hoping, if it would not trouble you, that I might solicit a private audience with Miss Elizabeth in the course of the morning.
Mrs. Bennet: Oh, yes. Certainly. Lizzie will be very happy indeed. Everyone, out. Mr. Collins would like a private audience with your sister.
Elizabeth Bennet: No, no, wait, please. I beg you. Mr. Collins can have nothing to say to me that anybody need not hear.
Mrs. Bennet: No nonsense, Lizzie. I desire you will stay where you are. Everyone else to the drawing room. Mr. Bennet?
Mr. Bennet: But...
Mrs. Bennet: Now.