It's a Wonderful Life

It's a Wonderful Life quotes

66 total quotes (ID: 298)

Clarence Oddbody
George Bailey
Mary Hatch
Multiple Characters


Tommy Bailey: Can you sing, Daddy?


Uncle Billy : Nobody ever changes here, you know that.

Young Violet: [commenting on George] I like him.
Young Mary: You like every boy.
Young Violet: What's wrong with that?

Pop: Mr. Potter, what makes you such a hard-skulled character? You have no family –– no children. You can't begin to spend all the money you've got.
Potter: So I suppose I should give it to miserable failures like you and that idiot brother of yours to spend for me.
Young George: He's not a failure! You can't say that about my father!

Violet: Good afternoon, Mr. Bailey.
George: Hello, Violet. Hey, you look good. That's some dress you got on there.
Violet: Oh this old thing? Why, I only wear it when I don't care how I look.

Pop: I know it's soon to talk about it.
George: Oh, now Pop, I couldn't. I couldn't face being cooped up for the rest of my life in a shabby little office...Oh, I'm sorry Pop, I didn't mean that, but this business of nickels and dimes and spending all your life trying to figure out how to save three cents on a length of pipe...I'd go crazy. I want to do something big and something important.
Pop: You know, George, I feel that in a small way we are doing something important. Satisfying a fundamental urge. It's deep in the race for a man to want his own roof and walls and fireplace, and we're helping him get those things in our shabby little office.
George: I know, Dad. I wish I felt...But I've been hoarding pennies like a miser in order to...Most of my friends have already finished college. I just feel like if I don't get away, I'd bust.
Pop: Yes...yes...You're right son.
George: You see what I mean, don't you, Pop?
Pop: This town is no place for any man unless he's willing to crawl to Potter. You've got talent, son. I've seen it. You get yourself an education. Then get out of here.
George: Pop, you want a shock? I think you're a great guy. [to Annie, listening through the door] Oh, did you hear that, Annie?
Annie: I heard it. About time one of you lunkheads said it.

George: [gazing eyes with Mary] Well, well, well.
Freddie Othello: Now, to get back to my story, see?
[in a trance, Mary hands Othello her drink, and George and Mary start dancing]
Freddie Othello: Hey, this is MY dance!
George: Oh, why don't you stop annoying poeple.
Freddie Othello: Well, I'm sorry - Hey!

George: Well, hello.
Mary: Hello. You look at me as if you didn't know me.
George: Well, I don't.
Mary: You've passed me on the street almost every day.
George: Me?
Mary: Uh-huh.
George: Uh-uh. That was a little girl named Mary Hatch. That wasn't you.

Mary: What'd you wish, George?
George: Well, not just one wish. A whole hatful, Mary. I know what I'm gonna do tomorrow, and the next day, and the next year, and the year after that. I'm shakin' the dust of this crummy little town off my feet and I'm gonna see the world. Italy, Greece, the Parthenon, the Colosseum. Then, I'm comin' back here and go to college and see what they know... And then I'm gonna build things. I'm gonna build airfields, I'm gonna build skyscrapers a hundred stories high, I'm gonna build bridges a mile long...

George: Mary... [picks up Mary's robe, which is lying on the ground] Okay, I give up. Where are you?
Mary: Over here in the hydrangea bushes.
George: Here you are. Catch. [He is about to throw her the robe, but reconsiders] Wait a minute. What am I doing? This is a very interesting situation.
Mary: Please give me my robe.
George: Hmmm...A man doesn't get in a situation like this every day.
Mary: I'd like to have my robe.
George: Not in Bedford Falls, anyway.
Mary: [thrashing around in the bushes] Ouch!
George: Gesundheit. This requires a little thought here.
Mary: George Bailey! Give me my robe!
George: I've heard about things like this, but I've never...
Mary: Shame on you. I'm going to tell your mother on you.
George: Oh, my mother's way up the corner there.
Mary: I'll call the police!
George: They're way downtown. They'd be on my side, too.
Mary: Then I'm going to scream!
George: Maybe I could sell tickets. No, no... Let's see. No, the point is, in order to get this robe...I've got it! I'll make a deal with you, Mary.

Dr. Campbell: I'm sure the whole board wishes to express its deep sorrow at the passing of Peter Bailey.
George: Thank you very much.
Dr. Campbell: It was his faith and devotion that are responsible for this organization.
Potter: I'll go further than that. I'll say that to the public Peter Bailey was the Building and Loan.
Billy: Oh, that's fine, Potter, coming from you, considering that you probably drove him to his grave.
Potter: Peter Bailey was not a business man. That's what killed him. Oh, I don't mean any disrespect to him, God rest his soul. He was a man of high ideals, so called, but ideals without common sense can ruin this town. Now, you take this loan here to Ernie Bishop...You know, that fellow that sits around all day on his brains in his taxi. You know...I happen to know the bank turned down this loan, but he comes here and we're building him a house worth five thousand dollars. Why?
George: Well, I handled that, Mr. Potter. You have all the papers there. His salary, insurance. I can personally vouch for his character.
Potter: A friend of yours?
George: Yes, sir.
Potter: You see, if you shoot pool with some employee here, you can come and borrow money. What does that get us? A discontented, lazy rabble instead of a thrifty, working class. And all because a few starry-eyed dreamers like Peter Bailey stir them up and fill their heads with a lot of impossible ideas. Now, I say...
George: Just a minute — just a minute. Now, hold on, Mr. Potter. You're right when you say my father was no business man. I know that. Why he ever started this cheap, penny-ante Building and Loan, I'll never know. But neither you nor anybody else can say anything against his character, because his whole life was...Why, in the twenty-five years since he and Uncle Billy started this thing, he never once thought of himself. Isn't that right, Uncle Billy? He didn't save enough money to send Harry to school, let alone me. But he did help a few people get out of your slums, Mr. Potter. And what's wrong with that? Why...Here, you're all businessmen here. Doesn't it make them better citizens? Doesn't it make them better customers? You...you said...What'd you say just a minute ago?...They had to wait and save their money before they even ought to think of a decent home. Wait! Wait for what? Until their children grow up and leave them? Until they're so old and broken-down that they...Do you know how long it takes a working man to save five thousand dollars? Just remember this, Mr. Potter, that this rabble you're talking about...they do most of the working and paying and living and dying in this community. Well, is it too much to have them work and pay and live and die in a couple of decent rooms and a bath? Anyway, my father didn't think so. People were human beings to him, but to you, a warped frustrated old man, they're cattle. Well, in my book he died a much richer man than you'll ever be!
Potter: I'm not interested in your book. I'm talking about the Building and Loan.
George: I know very well what you're talking about. You're talking about something you can't get your fingers on, and it's galling you. That's what you're talking about, I know...Well, I've said too much. I...You're the Board here. You do what you want with this thing. Just one more thing, though. This town needs this measly one-horse institution if only to have some place where people can come without crawling to Potter.

George: You know what the three most exciting sounds in the world are?
Billy: Uh-huh. Breakfast is served; lunch is served, dinner...
George: No, no, no, no! Anchor chains, plane motors, and train whistles.

Ma Bailey: Did you know that Mary Hatch is back from school?
George: Uh-huh.
Ma Bailey': Came back three days ago.
George: Hmmmm...
Ma Bailey: Nice girl, Mary.
George: Mmm Hmmmm....
Ma Bailey: Kind that will help you find the answers, George.
George: Hmmm...
Ma Bailey: Oh, stop that grunting.
George: Hmmm...
Ma Bailey: Can you give me one good reason why you shouldn't call on Mary?
George: Sure –– Sam Wainwright.
Ma Bailey: Hmmm?
George: Yes. Sam's crazy about Mary.
Ma Bailey: Well, she's not crazy about him.
George: Well, how do you know? Did she discuss it with you?
Ma Bailey: No.
George: Well then, how do you know?
Ma Bailey: Well, I've got eyes, haven't I? Why, she lights up like a firefly whenever you're around.
George: Oh...
Ma Bailey: And besides, Sam Wainwright's away in New York, and you're here in Bedford Falls.
George: And all's fair in love and war?
Ma Bailey: I don't know about war.
George: Mother, you know, I can see right through you –– right back to your back collar button... trying to get rid of me, huh?
Ma Bailey: Uh-huh.

Mary: Have you made up your mind?
George: How's that?
Mary: Have you made up your mind?
George: About what?
Mary: About coming in. Your mother just phoned and said you were on your way over to pay me a visit.
George: My mother just called you? Well, how did she know?
Mary: Didn't you tell her?
George: I didn't tell anybody. I just went for a walk and happened to be passing by... What do you... went for a walk, that's all.

Mary: It was nice about your brother Harry, and Ruth, wasn't it?
George: Oh... yeah, yeah. That's all right.
Mary: Don't you like her?
George: Well, of course I like her. She's a peach.
Mary: Oh, it's just marriage in general you're not enthusiastic about, huh?
George: No, marriage is all right for Harry, and Marty, and Sam and you.