Braveheart

Braveheart quotes

65 total quotes (ID: 94)

Argyle Wallace
King Edward Longshanks
Multiple Characters
Robert the Bruce
Stephen


Scotland, my land. The French will grovel to anyone with strength, but how will they believe our strength when we can not rule the whole of our own island?


Who is this person that speaks to me as though I needed his advice?

I heard word in France where I was fighting to expand your future kingdom. The word, my son, is that our entire Northern Army is annihilated.

[to Prince Edward] In the morning, I depart for France to press our rights there, and I leave you here to quell this little rebellion, understood? Is it? One day you will be a king. At least try to act like one.

Craig: Sir William, where are you going?
William: We have beaten the English, but they'll come back because you won't stand together.
Craig: Well what will you do?
William: I will invade England and defeat the English on their own ground.
Craig: Invade? That's impossible.
William: Why? Why is that impossible? You're so concerned with squabbling for the scraps from Longshank's table that you've missed your God given right to something better. There is a difference between us. You think the people of this country exist to provide you with possession. I think your possession exists to provide those people with freedom. And I go to make sure that they have it.

Isabelle: I understand you have recently been given the rank of knight.
William: I have been given nothing. God makes men what they are.
Isabelle: Did God make you the sacker of peaceful cities, the executioner of the king's nephew, my husband's own cousin?
William: York was the staging point for every invasion of my country. And that royal cousin hanged innocent Scots, even women and children, from the city walls. Oh, Longshanks did far worse the last time he took a Scottish city.
Hamilton: [to Isabelle] Sanguinarius homo indomitus est, et se dite cum mendacium. (He is a bloodthirsty savage, and he is telling lies.)
William: Ego nunquam pronunciari mendacium! Sed ego sum homo indomitus. (I never lie! But I am a savage.) [to Princess] Ou en français, si vous pr?f?rez? (Or in French, if you prefer?) [in English] You ask your king to his face, ask him, and see if his eyes can convince you of the truth.

I shall offer a truce and buy him off. But who will go to him? Not I. If I fell under the sword of that murderer, that might be my head in a basket. And not my gentle son. The mere sight of him would only encourage the enemy to take over the whole country. So whom do I send? Whom do I send?

Not the archers. My scouts tell me their archers are miles away and no threat to us. Arrows cost money. Use up the Irish. Their dead cost nothing.

Bring me Wallace. Alive if possible, dead... just as good.

The problem with Scotland, is that it is full of Scots.

If we can't drive them out, we will breed them out.

[voiceover] I shall tell you of William Wallace. Historians from England will say that I am a liar, but history is written by those who have hanged heroes. The King of Scotland had died without a son, and the king of England, a cruel pagan known as Edward the Longshanks, claimed the throne for himself. Scotland's nobles fought him, and fought each other, over the crown. So Longshanks invited them to talks of truce. No weapons, one page only. Among the farmers of that shire was Malcolm Wallace, a commoner, with his own lands. He had two sons: John and William.

[voiceover] Many years later, Edward the Longshanks, King of England, supervised the wedding of his eldest son, who would succeed him to the throne. As bride for his son, Longshanks had chosen the daughter of his rival, the King of France. It was widely whispered that for the princess to conceive, Longshanks would have to do the honors himself. That may have been what he had in mind all along.

Malcolm Wallace: Your heart is free. Have the courage to follow it.

Hamish: I should have remembered the rocks.