Apollo 13

Apollo 13 quotes

65 total quotes (ID: 45)

Gene Kranz
Jack Swigert
Jim Lovell
Marilyn Lovell
Multiple Characters


Television Reporter: Is there a specific instance in an airplane emergency when you can recall fear?
Jim Lovell: Uh well, I'll tell ya, I remember this one time - I'm in a Banshee at night in combat conditions, so there's no running lights on the carrier. It was the Shrangri-La, and we were in the Sea of Japan and my radar had jammed, and my homing signal was gone... because somebody in Japan was actually using the same frequency. And so it was - it was leading me away from where I was supposed to be. And I'm lookin' down at a big, black ocean, so I flip on my map light, and then suddenly: zap. Everything shorts out right there in my ****pit. All my instruments are gone. My lights are gone. And I can't even tell now what my altitude is. I know I'm running out of fuel, so I'm thinking about ditching in the ocean. And I, I look down there, and then in the darkness there's this uh, there's this green trail. It's like a long carpet that's just laid out right beneath me. And it was the algae, right? It was that phosphorescent stuff that gets churned up in the wake of a big ship. And it was - it was - it was leading me home. You know? If my ****pit lights hadn't shorted out, there's no way I'd ever been able to see that. So uh, you, uh, never know... what... what events are to transpire to get you home.


Listen to a recording of the original performance of this quote: Houston, we have a problem. Note: ranked #50 in the American Film Institute's list of the top 100 movie quotations in American cinema. In real life, the quote was "Houston, we've had a problem." Apollo Expeditions to the Moon, ch. 13.1, by James A. Lovell. The original phrase pronounced by Jack Swigert, "Houston, we've had a problem here" and then repeated by Lovell, "Houston, we've had a problem", was altered to a present-tense in the film script.

Gentlemen, what are your intentions? I'd like to go home.

There's nothing routine about flying to the moon, I can vouch for that.

Jim Lovell: I've trained for the Fra Mauro highlands... and this is FLIGHT SURGEON HORSESHIT, Deke!
Deke Slayton: Jim, if you hold out for Ken, you will not be on Apollo 13. It's your decision.

Lunar module has just become a lifeboat.

Sy Liebergot: Flight... I recommend we shut down reactant valves to the fuel cells.
Gene Kranz: What the hell good is that gonna do?
Sy Liebergot: If that's where the leak is, we can isolate it. We can save what's left in the tanks and we can run on the good cell.
Gene Kranz: You close 'em, you can't open 'em again! You can't land on the moon with one healthy fuel cell!
Sy Liebergot: Gene, the Odyssey is *dying*. From my chair here, this is the last option.

We just lost the moon.

Jim Lovell: Just a little while longer Freddo. Just a little while longer, we're gonna hit that water in the South Pacific. Open up that hatch. It's 80 degrees out there.
Fred Haise, Sr.: 80 degrees.

[Ken Mattingly is in the simulator trying to figure out Apollo 13's reentry procedure] Technician: Need a break, Ken?
Ken Mattingly: If they don't get one, I don't get one.

Politician: Jim, people in my state are asking why we're continuing to fund this program now that we've beaten the Russians to the moon.
Jim Lovell: Imagine if Christopher Columbus came back from the New World, and no one returned in his footsteps.

RETRO: We have a typhoon warning on the prime edge of the recovery area. Now this is just a warning, Flight, it could miss them.
Gene Kranz: Only if their luck changes.

Reporter: So the number 13 doesn't bother you?
Fred Haise: Only if it's a Friday.
Reporter: Apollo 13, lifting off at 13:13, and entering the moon's gravity on April 13th?
Jim Lovell: Well, uh, as a matter of fact, our own Ken Mattingly has done some... research on that particular phenomenon. Ken?
Ken Mattingly: Well, I uh, had a black cat walk over a broken mirror under the lunar module ladder, didn't seem to be a problem.

Ken Mattingly: 13, this is Houston, do you read?
Jim Lovell: Roger that, Ken. Are the flowers blooming in Houston?
Ken Mattingly: That's a negative, Jim. I do not have the measles.
[glares pointedly at the flight surgeon]

[explaining why he put a "NO" sign on the instrument panel] I was getting a little punchy and I didn't want to cut the LEM loose with you guys still in it.